Kristin Myers's blog

Niger: Four faces of hope

Niger consistently ranks as one of the world’s poorest countries, despite enjoying relative peace. But why? Niger’s struggle with poverty is a complex issue, but can be boiled down to a number of factors. Its population is the fastest growing in the world, which puts pressure and and strain on food production and social services. The country is also incredible vulnerable to climate shocks. Drought has caused harvests to fail, triggering food crises that make it hard for already struggling families and communities to catch up.

Niger: The 5 things you need to know

In 2016, the UN rated Niger the 2nd least developed country in the world with chronic high levels of malnutrition and poverty. Recurring climate shocks have left the country unable to produce enough food for its ever-growing population. While Niger itself is at peace, conflict and epidemics in neighboring countries have spilled over into its borders, further exacerbating the severe threats to lives and livelihoods.

Niger at a glance:

A journey to hope in Ethiopia

NYAKOUN’S REALITY

Nyakoun Tut is just 24, yet little in her young life has been easy. The mother of two lives in a refugee camp in the Gambella region of Ethiopia, just across the border from her home country, South Sudan.

Nyakoun recalls her home fondly. “We had a small farm, sheep, goats, and cattle. We always had enough.” But South Sudan has been gripped by conflict for the last six years, causing millions to flee to neighboring Uganda, Ethiopia, and Kenya — and Nyakoun was among those that fled.

An eco stove – the gift that keeps on giving in Sierra Leone

An old oil drum, from the words embossed on its side probably originating in France, is changing form into something which will positively impact the lives of these three people, their families, their neighbors and – in its own small way – the planet on which they live those lives.

The Superwoman of Masisi

Among the thousands of people that live in Katale, a town located in Masisi territory in the DRC’s North Kivu Province, there is one superwoman.

A miracle in Mogadishu

In a hunger crisis like the one Somalis have been experiencing throughout 2017, our teams witness some really harrowing sights and hear some desperately sad stories. But what drives them on, day after day, is the belief that they can help change the course of history and make things better. And they believe that because they’ve seen it happen — with kids like Yasmiin*.

5 things you need to know about the Rohingya crisis

1. WHO ARE THE ROHINGYA?

Often described as the “world’s most persecuted minority,” the Rohingya are a predominantly Muslim ethnic group, mostly concentrated in Rakhine, one of Myanmar’s poorest states. The Rohingya have lived in Myanmar for generations, many migrating from Bangladesh during British rule. After gaining independence, Myanmar, a majority Buddhist nation, refused to acknowledge the Rohingya as citizens, rendering them a stateless people.

Rohingyas Reach Paradise With Stories of Tragedy

REACHING PARADISE

It is beyond hot in the bamboo and plastic shelter that clings to a muddy hillside near the entrance to Hakim Para camp. The roof is a sheet of black plastic, which under the heat of the sun raises the temperature to around 110 degrees. A small cooking fire smolders in the corner and the sound of rainfall is steady and loud.

These are definitely not ideal living conditions, but for Shaju* it’s paradise. “Here I have peace,” she says.

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