Kristin Myers's blog

The Superwoman of Masisi

Among the thousands of people that live in Katale, a town located in Masisi territory in the DRC’s North Kivu Province, there is one superwoman.

A miracle in Mogadishu

In a hunger crisis like the one Somalis have been experiencing throughout 2017, our teams witness some really harrowing sights and hear some desperately sad stories. But what drives them on, day after day, is the belief that they can help change the course of history and make things better. And they believe that because they’ve seen it happen — with kids like Yasmiin*.

5 things you need to know about the Rohingya crisis

1. WHO ARE THE ROHINGYA?

Often described as the “world’s most persecuted minority,” the Rohingya are a predominantly Muslim ethnic group, mostly concentrated in Rakhine, one of Myanmar’s poorest states. The Rohingya have lived in Myanmar for generations, many migrating from Bangladesh during British rule. After gaining independence, Myanmar, a majority Buddhist nation, refused to acknowledge the Rohingya as citizens, rendering them a stateless people.

Rohingyas Reach Paradise With Stories of Tragedy

REACHING PARADISE

It is beyond hot in the bamboo and plastic shelter that clings to a muddy hillside near the entrance to Hakim Para camp. The roof is a sheet of black plastic, which under the heat of the sun raises the temperature to around 110 degrees. A small cooking fire smolders in the corner and the sound of rainfall is steady and loud.

These are definitely not ideal living conditions, but for Shaju* it’s paradise. “Here I have peace,” she says.

The world's ten hungriest countries

Worldwide, 815 million people still go hungry — a staggering figure that translates into one out of nine people. While global hunger levels have declined by 27% since 2000, according to the 2017 Global Hunger Index, 45% of deaths of children under five are linked to malnutrition. The report, released by Concern Worldwide, German aid agency Welthungerhilfe, and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), highlights massive food inequality around the globe.

10. TIMOR-LESTE

People power brings clean water to Central African Republic

When armed fighters came to Julien Dieudonné’s* village, he fled into the bush with his family. They lived in hiding for three months, foraging for food to survive.

Julien lives in Kouango in Central African Republic (CAR), a region decimated by conflict. Recently, soldiers attacked villages in the area, burning nearly 500 homes to the ground and forcing the population to flee for their lives.

A SCARCE RESOURCE

Why they ran: Stories from the front lines of the Rohingya crisis

Since August 25, more than 500,000 Rohingya have fled brutal violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state, crossing the border into Bangladesh. The journey is difficult — though the distance is relatively small, many of those fleeing are children, elderly, or injured. Even those in good health often arrive traumatized by the things they have seen.

Off the Grid: The Central African Republic

KEY FACTS:

  • Slightly smaller than the state of Texas, Central African Republic (CAR) has a population of 4.6 million people
  • The majority of the population is Christian, with a Muslim minority community
  • Natural resources include: diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil
  • More than 85% of the population is quite literally “off the grid” — lacking electricity
  • As of 2016, life expectancy was just under 52 years

Concern responds to worsening Rohingya crisis

Up to 400,000 Rohingya have crossed the border of Myanmar into Bangladesh since August 25, fleeing ethnic violence in Rakhine State in the country’s southwest. That’s more than a third of the country’s Rohingya population of roughly 1.1 million people.

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