USDA Local & Regional Procurement (LRP) Program

$15 million*

Minimum Requirement for American Leadership

 
The Local and Regional Procurement (LRP) Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the authorized level of $80 million provides more effective and flexible programming, primarily for developmental (non-emergency) food assistance activities that lift families out of cycles of poverty.

Download PDF

Justification for Funding

  • USDA LRP practices enable both emergency and non-emergency assistance to be delivered more quickly, at considerable savings, with the ultimate benefit of reaching larger numbers of vulnerable people compared with traditional U.S. food aid shipments.
  • USDA LRP programs serve as flexible tools to address the diversity of food insecurity conditions and contexts across the world and U.S.-funded development and humanitarian assistance programs must respond with a range of tools, modalities, and interventions. Resulting in:
  • A USDA study of the LRP pilot project shows that food aid purchased locally or regionally arrived, on average, 74 days faster than U.S.-sourced commodities.

Cost of Cuts Below $15 Million

President and Congress Budget Comparison

       Congressional Budget   

       President's Budget Request (Base + OCO)

  • Continuing to not fully fund USDA LRP limits the flexibility of implementing organizations to choose what form of assistance is the most effective particularly during humanitarian crises.
  • In the event of natural disasters or political conflict, it is imperative that humanitarian assistance arrive quickly to save lives and mitigate other related complexities like migration and displacement.

 

$80 million

Opportunity to Catalyze American Leadership

 

Justification for Additional Funding

  • Since passage of the 2014 Farm Bill, Congress has appropriated significantly less than the authorized level of $80 million for the Local and Regional Procurement (LRP) Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • The 2014 farm bill conference report’s statement of managers affirms that the intent of LRP programming is to complement existing food aid programs – especially the McGovern-Dole Food for Education program – and to fill in nutritional gaps for targeted populations, or food availability gaps generated by unexpected emergencies.
  • In order to most effectively carry out LRP activities, USDA should collaborate with USAID, per legislative guidance, as the agencies consider program design and the best ways to use this tool.
  • LRP also generates important developmental impacts by spurring local economic activity and helping form and strengthen sustainable local markets. For example, a local purchase program in Ethiopia that purchases food from smallholder farmers to use in school feeding programs generated over $16 million for farmers while at the same time keeping children full and focused during class.

Impact of Additional Funding

A USDA LRP Pilot Program found that buying grains in or near the country where the U.S. donates food aid saved 53% relative to purchasing grains in the U.S. and 25% in the case of legumes and pulses.

  • With funding at full authorized levels for LRP McGovern-Dole programs will be able to do more and provide more effective and flexible programming, primarily for developmental (non-emergency) food assistance activities that lift families out of cycles of poverty.
  • Resources would get to those in need faster. A report by Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that shipping food from the United States to sub-Saharan Africa took 100 days longer than procuring food from local or regional sources. Additionally, GAO reported that food from the United States can take four to six months to reach beneficiaries.

*FY18 Senate Committee-Approved Appropriation

For more information, please contact: Sara Nitz, snitz@interaction.org

Choose to Invest:   2018  |  2017  |  2016  |  2015  |  2014  |  2013  |  2012