Forum 2016 Workshops

 


Forum has a series of workshop tracks specifically designed for attendees at different stages in their careers—including a CEO track, topical tracks for professional staff, and a Young Professionals Summit. View the workshop track key below for more information on each track.

 

Workshop Track Key

0[] Building Inclusive and Resilient Communities

A range of environmental, geopolitical and socioeconomic shocks threaten the stability and development prospects of many vulnerable countries.  Resilience-building has become a key strategy to reduce the risks posed by shocks and stresses. Humanitarian and development actors are reshaping their programs, recognizing that inclusive community participation and support for resilience-building can greatly reduce the frequency and costs of emergency assistance and re-starting local economies.  Reflecting the complexity and scope of resilience as a thematic area, these workshops will share a range of relevant program experiences and emerging insights.

0[]  Communications

The Communications track is geared toward communications professionals at all levels. The workshops will explore the latest trends in communications and multimedia, and challenges facing organizations as they promote their work.

0[]  CEO Track

This track of workshops is designed for the CEOs of InterAction's member organizations as an opportunity to network, exchange ideas on pressing humanitarian and international development issues, and participate in strategic thinking and capacity building exercises with their peers. The sessions in this track are closed to other attendees.

0[]  Learning, Knowledge and Leadership

As the development landscape evolves, competition grows, and aid budgets shrink, it is increasingly important that NGOs demonstrate that they are making a visible and lasting impact. Yet cultivating an environment that allows reflection and learning, while also equipping NGO staff with the necessary skills to be strong leaders for our sector, poses challenges. This track will take an in-depth look at the approaches and tools organizations are using to ensure that NGOs are the most effective in programming. 

0[]  Future and Evolution of NGOs and Our Work

What will it take to mobilize sufficient resources to achieve the SDGs? What role will your organization play as one of the many actors providing capital in the new financing structures? Join this track to gain insights into emerging finance models and products for the development community. Workshops will cover the theory underpinning these new models, the various technologies and products making them possible, and lessons learned from some of the organizations advancing these exciting new practices and partnerships.

0[]  Effective Partnerships

Cutting across sectors, this track will take a look at a wide range of initiatives in the areas of humanitarian and development work. Participants will explore how trade can advance the Sustainable Development Goals, how agriculture can be nutrition sensitive and climate smart, innovative approaches to reducing hunger and poverty, how to mainstream the local systems approach, what it means to ensure availability of essential medicines and technologies, and the importance of building innovative strategies for economic empowerment. Collaborating with each other in all areas of our community, we will learn to work together to empower others.

0[]  Transparency and Accountability

The variety of workshops in the Transparency and Accountability track have one thing in common: a concern with improving the accountability and effectiveness of international development and humanitarian relief efforts. The workshops in this track deal with corruption, responsible data, strategic methods for civil-society led participation in governance and accountability, demonstrating value for money through monitoring and evaluation, driving performance improvement, among other issue areas. Participants will leave this track understanding more about how to cultivate efforts toward transparency and accountability within their respective organizations.

0[]  Young Professionals Summit

Often referred to as “Generation Y”, “Millennials”, or “the Peter Pan generation”, young professionals face many challenges in navigating the early years of their careers – from determining the most important skills and experiences to finding and engaging mentors. InterAction’s Young Professionals Summit (Tuesday, April 19) seeks to provide an outlet for young professionals to reflect upon the challenges they face and offer concrete suggestions to move ahead in pursuing a career in international development or humanitarian relief. The summit is a full day of speakers, workshops, and networking events tailored for professionals in the first half of their career.

TUESDAY, APRIL 19

8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Humanitarian Community Meeting

(Wilson C)

Every year at the InterAction Forum, the Humanitarian Policy and Practice unit organizes a community meeting for members interested and involved in humanitarian work. This session is open to all members. Breakfast will be served prior to the meeting.

The core of the meeting will be a roundtable conversation among three leaders of the humanitarian community from the US State Department, USAID, and UN OCHA. There will be ample opportunity for members to ask questions. If time permits, we will have an open discussion of challenges facing the NGO community in humanitarian response and how InterAction can better respond to these challenges on behalf of the membership.

Moderator:
Patty McIlreavy, Interim Vice President Humanitarian Policy & Practice

Speakers:
Catherine Wiesner, U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration
John Ging, Operations Director, UN Office of the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Jeremy M. Konyndyk, Director, USAID Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

0[]  Measuring Agency-Level Results: Can it Work, and Does It Matter? Findings From an InterAction White Paper

(Wilson A)

What can we say about what our organization is accomplishing at a global level? How many people are we reaching? To what degree and in what ways are we making a difference in people's lives? Are we achieving our mission? From big to small, dozens of NGOs are grappling with this challenge. While M&E experts struggle with whether and how to put effective agency-level results measurement systems into place, senior executives and external voices continue to press for ways to answer these fundamental questions.

In response to this challenge, InterAction’s Evaluation and Program Effectiveness Working Group – led by 11 major NGOs – commissioned a white paper to learn from organizations’ experiences in building agency-level results measurement systems. Researched and written by a team of industry experts, the paper aims to inform senior leaders, M&E staff, and the donor community about the practicality, implications, constraints, and potential of such initiatives. This workshop will present the paper’s findings and facilitate a discussion among a variety of organization staff.

Moderator:
Laia Grino, Director of Transparency, Accountability and Results, InterAction

Speakers:
Carlisle Levine, Independent Consultant, BLE Solutions, LLC
Chip Barnett, Senior Technical Advisor for Organizational Measurement, International Rescue Committee
Christie Getman, Senior Director, Program Quality and Technical Support, Lutheran World Relief
Tosca Bruno-van Vijfeijken, Transnational NGO Initiative, Syracuse University


 0[] Five Things New Evidence Shows about Local Ownership and Sustainability

(Wilson B)

Join distinguished experts for a panel discussion on new evidence linked to the role of local actors, sustainable service delivery and cost-effectiveness, as well as the latest advances in Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS). USAID’s first-ever Water and Development Strategy embraces Local Solutions in WASH. It recognizes the benefits of transitioning programs to local authorities and the effectiveness of local actors (natural leaders, teachers and local government staff) as catalysts for behavior change.  With funding from the Gates Foundation, Plan and the UNC Water Institute have been rigorously testing these methodologies in three countries and the results have implications for any program designed to transition to local actors.

Moderator:
Dr. Darren Saywell, Senior Director, Water, Sanitation and Health, Plan International USA

Speakers:
Dr. Jamie Bartram, Director, University of North Carolina Water Institute
John Sauer, Senior Technical Advisor, PSI
Jesse Shapiro, WASH Advisor and Sanitation Focal Point, USAID


0[] Planning and Measuring Social Media and Digital Advocacy: What Really Matters

(Harding)

Nonprofit organizations increasingly use social media as an essential communications and advocacy tool for policy and social change. This hands-on session will walk you through the process of developing, implementing and effectively measuring a digital advocacy strategy. It will also address the essential questions to ask as your organization or team builds, evaluates or expands its digital advocacy programs. Learn how to align your goals with the strengths and weaknesses of different online tools and explore how to set objectives, select meaningful indicators and analyze data to get the most out of your online advocacy. The session will include presentations from the discussion group leaders, followed by breakout groups in which participants will apply the skills and tools with a real case study. Whether your campaign focuses on the grassroots or on high-level policy wonkery, you’ll learn how to match your needs with the tools and tactics available today.

Speakers:
Lisa Hilt, Senior Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Advisor, Oxfam America
Rebecca Perlmutter, Monitoring, Evaluation and Learning Project Officer, Oxfam America
Colin Delany, Founder and Editor, Epolitics.com


0[] The Kids Are Alright (Tackling Your Career Challenges)

(Coolidge)

So your boss doesn’t listen to you, you’re thinking about grad school, or wait, should you go into the field? And you’re contemplating finally taking up that Arabic class, but really want to ask for advice from the (highly accomplished) Vice President – whom you also think should be your mentor. ACK! You’ve got questions on your mind, and some challenges you need to think through, but don’t worry, it’ll be alright! Join this highly interactive workshop, designed to help you identify your top challenges of 2016, and workshop solutions and next steps with your peers.  Facilitated by a career coach who specializes in young professionals in the nonprofit space, this workshop will utilize unique methods that will help you identify your challenges, and decide the best steps for you to overcome them.

Speakers:
Stacy Campesi, CPC, ELI-MP, SLC Coaching


0[]  NGOs and the Complex Challenges of Urbanization

(Hoover)

SDG Goal 11 provides global goals in regards to the challenges and opportunities of urbanization. The SDGs have little to say about the deeper dynamics and challenges at the urban level: the socio-spatial dimensions are missing altogether. How do we shift from external factors affecting urbanization and local impacts to how urbanization affects the future dynamics of poverty, governance and sustainability? This workshop is designed to focus on organizational challenges that will allow participants to engage in key questions:

How do our organizations currently approach problems of poverty, resilience and governance in urban settings?
What are the obstacles to greater involvement in urban settings?
What are we in the NGO community currently doing or know that others are doing?
How do we provide a platform to become more equipped to address urbanization challenges?

Moderator:
Stephen Commins, Associate Director, Global Public Affairs, Luskin School, UCLA

Speakers:
Patrick Crump, Associate Vice President, Program Quality and Impact, Save the Children
Margaret Arnold, Senior Social Development Specialist, World Bank
Wale Osofisan, Governance Technical Advisor, International Rescue Committee


0[] More Flexible Funding: How Reforming Donor Tied Aid Could Bolster Local Ownership and Better Results (InterAction CEOs only)

(Madison A/B)

Resources for development are often restricted by agendas outside the communities where the resources flow. From Official Development Assistance rules to foundation priorities and the requirements of public appeals, donors often restrict funds that limit the ability of local actors and their partners to shape programs and spending priorities. However, as local actors from community based organizations to national governments have increasingly shaped development strategies, restrictions on funding and donor rules have been often criticized for not allowing host governments and local communities the flexibility to fund locally determined needs. Representatives from civil society and government agencies, including the French agency for development, will explore the pros and cons of donor funding directives and their impact on efforts that bolster local ownership.

Moderator:
Carolyn Miles, President & CEO, Save the Children

Speakers:
Dana Hyde, Chief Executive Officer, Millennium Challenge Corporation
Alex Thier, Former Assistant to the Administrator for Policy, Planning, and Learning, USAID
Larry Nowels, Independent Consultant
Philippe Orliange, Director of Strategy, Partnerships, and Communication, Agence Française de Développement (French Development Agency)


0[]  Alternative Financing for Global Health

(McKinley)

This workshop will discuss and explore some of the new methods of funding international development that have been made possible by new technology over the past several years. In particular, we will look at crowdfunding for global health and development as well as at microloan technology. We will broach questions such as: How do these new technologies interact with traditional grant-making and funding sources in international development? How do these new technologies ensure quality programs and collection of meaningful outcomes? What evidence exists and what evidence do we need about the impact of these innovative financing technologies on development?

Moderator:
Sara Gorman, PhD, MPH, Project Manager, Janssen Global Public Health

Speakers:
Derek Fetzer, Director, Janssen Global Public Health
Olumide Elegbe, MPH, Associate Director of Partnerships, FHI 360
Rachel Silverman, Senior Policy Analyst, Center for Global Development

1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

0[] Techniques for Practitioners: Reaching the Hardest to Reach Youth through Community-Led Interventions

​(Wilson A)

Cultivating meaningful long-term youth engagement in public life is often times extremely challenging, particularly in post-conflict or transitional environments. Young people typically exhibit a high degree of interest in specific social movements, or political events, yet struggle to translate that interest into the long-term engagement necessary for a functional society. A growing evidence base has shown that CBT and other youth engagement techniques are effective at either engaging at-risk youth in civic and public life in their communities prior to contributing to violence and criminal activities, or offering a path to reintegration after becoming involved in such violence.

Moderator:
Ambar Zobairi, Deputy Regional Director, IFES

Speakers:
Brett Sedgewick, Technical Specialist and Former Country Director, Liberia, Global Communities
Augusta Featherston, Youth Adviser, IFES
Klubosumo Johnson Borh, Founder, Network for Empowerment and Progressive Initiatives


0[] 0[] Social Enterprise: The Next Big Thing or a Passing Fad?

(Wilson B)

Development cannot continue to be business as usual. In the wake of the global financial crisis and government austerity, donor dollars are declining and political champions are harder to find. Donors are increasingly interested in approaches that leverage Official Development Assistance (ODA) flows to attract additional sources of revenue (e.g. private investment, Domestic Resource Mobilization, revenue from "beneficiaries," etc.). Join the Alliance to End Hunger and One Acre Fund as a panel discusses how social enterprises are providing a promising new avenue to add critical inputs, financing, infrastructure, and training across value chains in the developing world; and can play a complimentary role to traditional aid projects. This panel discussion features practitioners from a range of sectors and will address ways to utilize social enterprise to help build stronger partnerships and more sustainable development.

Moderator:
Roger Thurow, Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Speakers:
Justin Finnegan, Deputy Assistant to the Administrator, Bureau for Food Security, USAID
David Hong, Global Senior Policy Analyst, One Acre Fund
Chavanne Hanson, Nutrition, Health and Wellness Lead, Nestlé
Mary Pat McVay, Research and Knowledge Manager, Opportunity International


0[]  Key Trends Shaping the Strategic Direction and Impact of NGOs

(Wilson C)

In this kick-off session, Accenture Development Partnerships will explore the major trends shaping the future and relevance of NGOs with a particular focus on innovative financing, social enterprises and digital trends. Bringing together prominent speakers to share experiences and perspectives across each of these key areas, the panelists will focus on how these trends have influenced their organizations as well as their responses in order to remain relevant and impactful. During this session, audience members will have the opportunity to pose questions to the panelists and then engage directly in collective knowledge sharing and learning through a group breakout session. With a focus on the direction and specific actions NGOs can take to lead their organizations into the 21st century, this kick-off will provide an overall framework to analyze and drive the next generation of social impact work.

Moderator:
Ryan Johnson, Client Services Lead, Accenture Development Partnerships

Speakers:
Ambassador (ret.) John Simon, Founding Partner, Total Impact Capital
John Whalen, President- Pact Ventures, Pact
Abi Weaver, Director- Global Technology Project, American Red Cross


0[]  Lies, Damned Lies and Statistics? Data, Evidence and Communicators in Global Development

(Harding)

There is hunger in the global development industry for evidence: data, M&E, evaluations – all of these have become of paramount importance in influencing decision-making. Communications staff, however, are often far less comfortable with data than narrative, and are not necessarily equipped to be able to judge which data might be story-worthy or which might be suspect, or how to effectively promote data-based stories. This workshop will bring together communicators, data experts and economists to discuss how communications staff can be best equipped to deal with this rapid change in the industry. It will involve both informed discussions and interactive case studies with audience participation of dos and don’ts.

Moderator:
David Humphries, Vice President, Communications & Public Affairs, Global Communities

Speakers:
Julian Jamison, Senior Economist, Global Insights Initiative, World Bank
Davina Durgana, Associate Professor, SIT Graduate Institute
Jennifer Lentfer, Director of Communications, IDEX, and creator of how-matters.org


0[]  Development and Humanitarianism 101: A Crash Course in Becoming a Technical Expert

(Coolidge)

You’re fascinated by peacebuilding and want to meet an expert, or you have no idea what it takes to become an M&E professional, here is your chance to learn everything you need to know but were too afraid to ask. In this session, participants will have the opportunity to take a ‘101 course’ with an expert on two topics of their choice. It may be a sector you are already familiar with, providing an opportunity to meet an expert and learn more. Or perhaps you’re a novice and want to figure out how to break into a new field. Either way, you’ll walk away with key themes and emerging trends in areas such as inclusive development, peacebuilding, humanitarianism, monitoring and evaluation, workforce development and global health. Come for this interactive session and leave with the resources you need to take the next step towards advancing your career.

Speakers:
Jennifer Collins-Foley, Senior Advisor, Inclusive Development, World Learning
Christie Getman, Senior Director, Technical Support and Program Quality Unit, Lutheran World Relief
Ann Canavan, Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) Officer, International Medical Corps
Patricia McIlreavy, Senior Director, Humanitarian Policy, InterAction
Sarah McLaughlin, Deputy Director of Learning and Evaluation, Alliance for Peacebuilding
Mike Tetelman, Principal International Technical Advisor, Education Development Center 


0[]  A Conversation with the Executive Office (InterAction Member CEOs only)

(Hoover)

This will be a candid, informal exchange on policy, leadership, and trends that are shaping our community and InterAction’s role. During this session, where any topic is welcome, InterAction’s Chief Executive Officer Sam Worthington and President Lindsay Coates will explore collective solutions to our common concerns, share lessons learned during the last year, and examine the priorities guiding InterAction’s future course.

Speakers:
Sam Worthington, Chief Executive Officer, InterAction
Lindsay Coates, President, InterAction


0[] Working With Humanitarian Standards in Urban Response

(Madison A/B)

The panel will present findings from the Sphere guidance "Sphere for Urban Response". This long-awaited guidance is an essential complement to the best-known and most widely used humanitarian standards. It identifies approaches in the 2011 edition of the Sphere Handbook, which are particularly interesting for urban programming, as well as gaps in current Sphere guidance for urban response. Identifying these gaps constitutes a first step and fore-taster of the upcoming Sphere Handbook revision.  After a brief introduction to the topic and the guide's main findings, three panellists will elaborate on specific aspects of the guidance, such as contextualization of universal standards, using standards and indicators to help define an urban humanitarian emergency, cross-sectoral approaches, applying the Protection Principles and the Core Humanitarian Standard in urban settings, and meaningful accountability to affected urban populations through working with standards. The floor will then be open for discussion.

Moderator:
Christine Knudsen, Director, the Sphere Project

Speakers:
Dale Buscher, Senior Director for Programs, Women's Refugee Commission
Anne O'Mahony, Director of International Programmes, Concern Worldwide
Charles Setchell, Senior Shelter, Settlements, and Hazard Mitigation Advisor, USAID/OFDA


0[]  The Global Health Security Agenda and the Role of Civil Society Organizations: Creating Effective Partnerships for Change

(McKinley)

The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) is an international effort of over 44 countries led by the US and includes, international organizations, civil society organizations, private stakeholders and experts on animal and human health, food safety, law enforcement and research and development to accelerate progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious diseases threats and to promote global health security. The donor community, on the heels of the Ebola crises and the rising threat of disease threats such as Zika, are issuing broader calls for programs designed to prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease threats. As interest in health security grows, a multi-sectorial response is needed to achieve the Agenda’s five year objectives. This workshop will engage a diverse group of panelists from organizations to discuss the growing importance of health security and its effect on the global community and potential strategies to meet the 5 year objectives of the GHSA.

Moderator:
Mary Pack, Vice President, International Medical Corps

Speakers:
Vishal Patel, Senior Director for Global Affairs, EMD Serono
Richard Brennan, Director of Emergency Risk Management & Humanitarian Response
Elizabeth Cameron, PhD, Director- Countering Biological Threats, National Security Council, PhD, Director- Countering Biological Threats, National Security Council


0[]  More Meaningful Measures in the Middle? Reconsidering Outcome Monitoring for Governance Interventions

(Jackson)

This workshop illustrates how donors and implementing organizations can utilize smarter M&E tools, approaches, and methodologies to improve their governance programming. The presentation will focus on an example from Somaliland to demonstrate how theories of change for governance programs are constructed and how considering the "middle" of those change trajectories could be better leveraged for M&E purposes. The breakout group and discussion section will used to apply those lessons to other real-world programming examples.

Moderator:
Gabriel Tobias, Program Officer, Governance, International Republic Institute

Speakers:
Lauren Oing, Senior Manager - Crisis, Conflict & Governance Practice, International Business & Technical Consultants, Inc.
Tomas Bridle, Legislative Specialist, USAID
Elizabeth Lewis, Senior Program Office for Africa, International Republican Institute 

3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

0[] 0[] A Data Revolution for Development

(Wilson A)

This workshop aims to raise awareness of different data gaps in international development and identify measures to close these gaps. We’ll kick off by describing some of the data gaps that we deal with in development and some of the initiatives underway to fill those gaps. Audience members will be invited to join small group discussions and make suggestions for what they and their organisations can do to produce, share and use data, and what we can do to reconcile top-down and bottom-up initiatives. We hope to identify – and demonstrate – the different actions people can take and draw on one another’s experiences.

Moderator:
Rupert Simons, CEO, Publish What You Fund

Speaker:
Dustin Homer, Director of Engagement and Partnerships, Development Gateway
Ben Parker, Chief Executive, IRIN news


0[]  Turning the Humanitarian System on its Head: The Perspective of Local Actors

(Wilson B)

There has been a dramatic increase in the discourse about locally led humanitarian action. Despite the positive development that seemingly everyone in Washington, DC, New York, Geneva, London, and many other places is talking about the need for better international-local humanitarian partnerships, better capacity-strengthening of local actors, and localization of humanitarian assistance, we note the absence of the local actors themselves from these conversations. What do civil society actors and government officials on the frontlines think about these topics? What types of partnerships do they want with international actors? What capacities do they want to strengthen, and what is their preferred method? Is direct funding critically important to them, as opposed to indirect funding via INGOs? What do they think locally led humanitarian assistance looks like, and when would they like to see it? How can locally-led humanitarian assistance and capacity-strengthening work in a conflict setting? Join us for a dynamic panel where local actors are not only “at the table,” they make up the table!

Moderator:
Sahar Ali, Humanitarian Program Manager, Oxfam America, Sudan

Speakers:
Satya Brata Saha, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief, Government of Bangladesh
Sidi Mohamed Jaquité, Executive Secretary, National Association for Local Urban Development (NADEL), Guinea Bissau


0[]  Strengthening Regional Networks for International Collaboration

(Wilson C)

It’s no secret that Washington DC is the hub of international development activity in the US. But across the country, in areas not traditionally considered international hotbeds, organizations are banding together to develop robust regional and city-based networks. These networks have proven pivotal for building the capacity of organizations, increasing public recognition of international industries, and helping the organizations involved to collaborate and increase the impact of their work – without getting on a plane. This workshop features leaders of several of these networks in Denver, Seattle, Boston, Minneapolis and Pittsburgh who will share experiences and successful strategies. Breakout groups will allow participants to explore their own ideas for local network-building, focusing in areas of panelist expertise that include: growing a network from scratch, building a co-working space, and developing programming to promote collaboration. The goal of this workshop is to continue beyond the end of this session and develop a coast-to-coast peer-learning group of regional networks.

Moderator:
Doug Vilsack, Executive Director, Posner Center for International Development

Speakers:
Kristen Dailey, Executive Director, Global Washington
Nathan Darity, Executive Director, Global Switchboard
Sara McGarraugh, Board Member, Minnesota International NGO Network
Simone LaPray, Board Member, Boston Network for International Development


0[] 0[] Creating a Culture of Knowledge Sharing and Learning Within Organizations Large and Small

(Harding)

In the last year, the global development community has come together to renew a shared set of sustainable development goals. Achieving these goals will depend on the evolving and adaptive role of development and humanitarian organizations as catalysts for effective knowledge identification, analysis, adaptation, and use. In a time of increased attention to aid effectiveness, development and humanitarian organizations will need to leverage each other’s expertise and knowledge on what works, what doesn’t, and why.  Organizational culture, capacity, and systems either block or facilitate effective knowledge creation and sharing.  What are the contributing factors to an effective culture of knowledge management and learning? How do they fit together?  During this discussion, panelists will share what their organizations have attempted to improve their knowledge and learning systems, particularly why was there an investment in learning, what were the components of an effective learning culture, and how to take it forward no matter where an organization is in their organizational evolution. 

Moderator:
Mr. Nazir Ahmad, President, Givingworks

Speakers:
Muluemebet Chekol Hunegnaw, Senior Director, Monitoring, Evaluation and Knowledge Management, International Programs, Save the Children.
Abha Joshi-Ghani, Director, Leadership, Learning and Innovation (Client Services), The World Bank
Stacey Young, PhD, Senior Learning Advisor, Bureau for Policy, Planning and Learning, Office of Learning, Evaluation and Research, US Agency for International Development
Luis Ortiz Echevarría, MPH, Manager, Knowledge Management & Learning, Performance, Learning and Impact (PLI), Management Sciences for Health


0[]   Evolution of the NGO Sector: A Seat at the Table

(Coolidge)

The nature of international development and humanitarian action is changing. The NGO sector faces new and greater challenges to respond to communities in conflict or natural disasters and work with new actors from the private sector and local communities. In 20 years the context in which we work may look very different and a new generation of leadership will be in place. Young professionals today are the leaders of NGOs in the future. This session will bring together NGO leadership and young professionals to engage in an active discussion about the evolution of the NGO sector and the role that young professionals can play in shaping that future. With a keynote address and an open discussion with young professionals, this session will explore the changing environment for NGOs and the role that young professionals may play in ensuring that the sector remains relevant and effective.

Speakers:
Derick W. Brinkerhoff, Distinguished Fellow in International Public Management, RTI International (Research Triangle Institute)
Charles MacCormack, former President and CEO, Save the Children
Maïssa Khattab, MA Candidate, International Development Studies, Elliot School of International Affairs


0[]  Annual Members Meeting (InterAction Members Only)

(Hoover)

InterAction member CEOs or their designated representatives are invited to join InterAction’s Annual Members Meeting. The meeting will introduce members to issues under consideration by the Board of Directors, including the election of new Board members, revisions to the InterAction Bylaws, and offer a dialogue with Neal Keny-Guyer, InterAction’s Board Chair, Sam Worthington, Chief Executive Officer, and members on different committees on the Board. A quorum is required.


0[] Evolving Communications to Shift Public Attitudes

(Madison A/B)

A shift in tone can open the minds of those who question the impact of global development and humanitarian aid work and their role within it. Research across four countries (U.S., UK, France, Germany) found that the biggest barriers to public support are a sense of cynicism, distance, and futility. It also found we can shift the perspective of the almost 40% of the engaged public who are unsure of our sector’s impact. This workshop will teach you how to combat negative attitudes and help the public believe they can make a difference. We will hear from organizations implementing this research and participants will have the opportunity to test out the research on their own writing. (Bring something to edit!) Join us in combating negative attitudes and helping the public believe they can make a difference.

Moderator:
Deborah Willig, Director, Communications and Outreach, InterAction

Speakers:
Alison Carlman, Senior Manager, Marketing and Communications, GlobalGiving
Lynda Perry, Senior Writer and Content Specialist, ChildFund International
Colin Smith, Director, Communications, RESULTS


0[] 0[] 0[] NGO and CSO Advocacy Capacity: If You Build It, Will It Work?

(McKinley)

Development advocacy by organizations in the global North has grown in its maturity and impact with donors over the past two decades. Now there is an increasing focus to strengthen influence on government policy and financing in the global South. The most effective organizations for such advocacy would ideally be located in the South, but many groups there do not have the capacity required.  This workshop will include:  a demonstration of Alliance for Justice’s International Advocacy Capacity Tool and insights from analysis of 280 US NGOs that used the domestic version to identify advocacy strengths and needs; learnings from the development of a grantmaking strategy to strengthen CSO advocacy capacity in East Africa; and knowledge from funder and NGO experiences developing and strengthening CSO advocacy capacity worldwide. These presentations will provide participants opportunities to utilize current work on advocacy capacity to identify and address their own organizational strengths and gaps.

Moderator:
Jackie Williams Kaye, Director of Research and Evaluation, Wellspring Advisors

Speakers:
David Devlin-Foltz, Vice President, Impact Assessment, The Aspen Institute
Sue Hoechstetter, Senior Adviser for Foundation Advocacy & Evaluation, Alliance for Justice
Rachel Wilson, Principal, Catalysts for Change

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20

9:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

0[]  Village Agent Models and Their Contribution to Health, Wealth and Resilience

(Wilson A)

How can development actors ensure that all farmers, including women and youth, have access to finance, markets, fair prices and climate-smart technical assistance? Village Based Agent (VBA) Models offer a diverse, dynamic local network of social entrepreneurs. Through VBAs, rural communities have direct access to high quality seeds, fertilizers, tools, and a range of services in irrigation, livestock, horticulture, finance and insurance.

This interactive session will examine the evolution of VBA models and how VBAs contribute to building inclusive and resilient communities. Participants will learn about the conceptual differences of the various models from NCBA CLUSA and other organizations that have had success with them, and will also learn about the real world impacts that VBAs have on production, revenues, family health and nutrition, climate change adaptation, and family resilience.

Moderator:
Todd Crosby, Senior Technical Director, NCBA CLUSA

Speakers:
Reuben Banda, Managing Director, MUSIKA-Making Agricultural Markets Work for Zambia
Todd Crosby, Senior Technical Director, NCBA CLUSA
Abdoul Karim Gueye, National Director – Senegal, Heifer International


0[]  Impact Investing Can Be One of NGOs’ Tools for Success: The MicroBuild Fund

(Wilson B)

Habitat For Humanity, like so many INGOs, is changing its business models to best serve their clients, and is expanding its services beyond providing access to basic social services.  How can this be done? Together with business partners and funders from the social investment capital world, using MicroBuild as a best case and success scenario, get an insider look at the strategic process behind this major INGOs’ move to incorporating a limited liability company, the internal process and culture adaptation challenges, and lessons learned and course correction over the three years of life of the fund.  As the role of the international NGOs is challenged, the audience will share ideas that can assist their strategic planning.

Moderator:
Jyoti Patel, Director Capital Markets, Housing Finance and Market Development, Habitat for Humanity International


0[]  A Solutions-Based Workshop: Refugees' Right to, Access to and Conditions of Work

(Wilson C)

The right and access to work for refugees brings in development, refugee host countries, and resettlement countries. In this interactive workshop, an introductory panel will be followed by breakout groups where participants will share lessons learned for how they address different challenges related to the right and access to work both domestically in the United States and internationally. Globally, the workshop will discuss formal barriers (countries that do not allow the right to work) and advocacy, the perception barrier (limiting refugees’ ability to work in practice despite laws allowing refugees to work based on perceptions that that livelihood support will make refugees want to stay in the country and impede repatriation).  On resettlement, the workshop will discuss partnerships with major employers and overcoming degree/certification challenges, education/recertification, non-recognition of refugee work authorization, and waiting periods. The workshop will conclude with each breakout group sharing their key lessons learned.

Speakers:
Dr. Mahmoud Almadhoun, HR & Operations Director, Islamic Relief – Germany
Jessica Therkelsen, Global Policy Director, Asylum Access
Holly Herrera, Program Officer, PRM Office of Refugee Admissions
Eskinder Negash, Vice President for Global Engagement, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants
Sarah Ibrahim, Advocacy Officer, U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants


0[]  What's the Fuss About Cash?

(Harding)

Cash transfer programs (CTP) are more and more commonplace in emergency response and recovery.  These can include conditional or unconditional cash; mobile money or debit cards; multi-purpose cash or cash intended to meet sector outcomes like shelter or WASH; vouchers restricted to certain purchases, like nutritious foods; or others.  As the humanitarian community expands its use of cash transfers, we are challenged by how to do cash better:  How do we know cash is having an effective impact?  What’s the role of innovation? And, if cash is so great, what’s hindering us from doing more? 

In this discussion-focused workshop, participants will examine field experience, old myths, and new evidence to explore these questions. We’ll also look at how and when cash can and can’t meet sector objectives – and how the humanitarian architecture can promote effective multi-sectoral programs.  Ultimately, we’ll also be posing the questions:  Are our organizations ready for cash?  What systems are working? What needs to change?

Moderator:
Jenny Coneff, Cash Learning Partnership

Speakers:
Emily Farr, Senior Advisor, Oxfam
William Martin, Technical Advisor- Cash and Markets, Catholic Relief Services
Greg Matthews, International Rescue Committee


0[] 0[] Implementing Agenda 2030 for All:  Multi-Sector and Cross-Movement Collaboration for Effective Inclusion of All Voices

(Coolidge)

This workshop will address how cross-sector and multi-sector collaboration are critical for effective implementation of the 2030 Agenda to leave no one behind and reach all marginalized groups.  On the global level, during the post-2015 intergovernmental negotiations leading up to the adoption of  2030 Agenda, cross-sector collaboration helped ensure an inclusive approach within the new global development agenda.  This panel will explore learnings from successful SDG advocacy and discuss how strategies used during post-2015 negotiations can be leveraged on national and regional levels during SDG implementation. Participants will learn about concrete examples of global partnership and cross-movement collaborations between civil society movements to ensure representation of all groups in development planning and monitoring processes. From the disability movement to the Indigenous Peoples movement to the LGBTQ movement, cross-movement collaboration is already happening. Finally, participants will learn first hand how an international foundation mainstreamed disability inclusion within their mandate.

Moderator:
Lisa Adams, Program Director, Disability Rights Fund

Speakers:
Elizabeth Lockwood, CBM Representative at the UN, CBM International
Susan Sygall, CEO, Mobility International USA


0[] 0[]  21st Century Trade Agreements: Challenges for Sustainable Development 

(Hoover)

The Trans Pacific Partnership, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment and other mega-regional agreements are intended to set the "Gold Standards" for future trade deals, including potentially shifting norms on investment, public procurement, seed saving and food security, and access to medicines. The TPP text has now been published, and additional information on the ongoing TTIP negotiations is available. Join us to learn more about trends in trade and potential implications for developing countries.

Moderator:
Karen Hansen-Kuhn, International Program Director, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Speakers:
Chloe Schwabe, Faith Economy Ecology Program Director, Maryknoll Office for Global Concerns
Manuel Pérez Rocha, Associate Fellow, Institute for Policy Studies
 


0[]  Strategic Philanthropy: Addressing the Challenges of the 21st Century (InterAction CEOs Only)

(Madison A/B)

The strategy and theory of change foundations use to focus limited resources is shifting. This session will explore how major foundations are evolving their strategies to address issues of inequity and deeper engagement of local development actors while increasing access to services and working with new partners to achieve scale for successful programs. As new stakeholders--private sector, millennial philanthropists, donor advised funds, etc.--have emerged, foundations are partnering to both leverage their resources and to have a greater impact. Foundations are also aiming to maximize their impact by evolving their relationships with governments. Others are focusing on civic space and the voice of civil society. In the context of this new era, panelists will share their own investment strategies, how they are adapting to the changing aid ecosystem, and provide insights on how organizations can best adapt their practices to yield greater results.

Moderator:
Lindsay Coates, President, InterAction

Speakers:
Jonas Rolett, Special Advisor to Chairman George Soros, Open Society Foundations
Martín Abregú, Vice President for Democracy, Rights, and Justice, Ford Foundation
Eric Kessler, Founder, Principal, and Senior Managing Director, Arabella Advisors


0[]  More Flexible Funding: Supporting the Reform of Earmarks and Presidential Initiatives to Bolster Country Ownership

(McKinley)

Local Ownership of development has been a signature part of aid effectiveness for more than a decade. Yet, a 2015 audit of USAID's country strategies (CDCS) found that nearly half had been drafted based on local priorities only to be revised by Washington to reflect budget restrictions from presidential initiatives and congressional earmarks. High-level USAID staff have referred to the impact of earmarks and initiatives as "crippling" their efforts to craft and resource strategies and RFAs that reflect local priorities to foster sustainability.

This workshop will present new research documenting the negative impact of earmarks and initiatives on the ability of USAID Missions to respond to local knowledge and priorities. It will also explore how INGOs can stop fueling this problem and become part of a viable solution.

Moderator:
Dr. Tessie San Martin, CEO, Plan International USA

Speakers:
Larry Nowels, Independent Consultant
Alex Thier, Former Assistant to the Administrator for Policy, Planning, and Learning, USAID
Lindsay Lee Plack, Director of Government Relations, US Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC)

10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

0[]  Yes, it's innovative but does it work? M&E for Innovative Finance for Development

(Wilson A)

The changing financing environment for development organizations has encouraged international NGOs (INGOs) to seek new, innovative channels to finance their operations and innovative finance has emerged as a promising and increasingly popular tool to address the gap in funding and to increase the collaboration between the private, public and social sectors. While there are indications that innovative finance has helped achieve development outcomes, it is still a complex and not well understood space. Join private leaders moving and shaking the way business and traditional development finances work together, and increase your understanding of how to monitor and evaluate innovative finance projects.

Speakers:
Edward Jackson, E.T. Jackson and Associates
Veronica Chau, Dalberg Global Development Advisors


0[]  How Does Digitally Enabled Activism Change the Type, Quantity and Quality of Citizen Support to Your NGO’s Cause?

(Wilson C)

‘Disruptive change’ is a buzzword in current debates within international civil society. The rise of this notion corresponds with the emergence of new forms of social activism and citizenship engagement through digitally enabled NGOs, platforms and networks. Many digital NGOs have sprung up in the last ten years and become significant players in civil society, both in the U.S. and globally. MoveOn.org, Avaaz, Change.org, SumOfUs, and ONE are examples on the advocacy end of the spectrum, while Kiva and GlobalGiving for example claim to democratize development aid through peer-to-peer funding models. Some ‘brick and mortar’ NGOs have responded to these challengers by adopting “supporter-led platforms” (such as Greenpeace) that are designed to democratize citizen involvement in NGOs and to enhance NGO impact. How does this ‘citizen-centric’ approach compare with a more ‘staff-led’ approach? And how does such a shift in approach affect programming as well as the culture and self-understanding of NGOs?

Moderator:
Tosca Bruno-van Vijfeijken, Director, Transnational NGO Initiative, Syracuse University

Speakers:
Matt Daggett, Senior Advisor, Digital Mobilization Lab (MobLab), Greenpeace
Professor Dave Karpf, George Washington University
Mike Jones, Senior Campaigner, Change.org


0[] 0[] Design: An Alternative Approach to Understanding Problems

(Harding)

Participants will be introduced broadly to the design process with a specific focus on problem framing. Participants will analyze a body of collected data to inform their understanding of the design challenge, such as videos, interviews, transcripts, and photographs; and synthesize information to begin the process of 'problem framing.' Design provides an alternative and effective method for problem framing and problem solving that brings value through its inclusivity of diverse perspectives and stakeholders and its emphasis on context. By focusing on problem framing, we hope to underscore how the way a problem is defined ultimately influences the substance and assumptions embedded in possible solutions. Our design challenge will be on Smart Slums, (1) To understand trends around migration, rapid urbanization, slum growth, and the rise of smart city technologies; and (2) To investigate its range of impacts on diverse stakeholders and communities. Our ultimate goal is to spark deeper interest in design methods and encourage participants to further explore how design can be applied to their work as an approach to generating sustainable, human-centered outcomes.

Speakers:
Dominique Narciso, Founder + Chief Collaborator, AidWell
Hannah Koenig, Designer-in-Residence, The Collaboratory, State Department Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs
Meghan Lazier, Design Strategist, The LAB@OPM


0[]  Safe Surgery: the Misunderstood and Essential Link in Global Health and Development

(Wilson B)

In 2015, major policy developments and new evidence put essential surgical care on the global health agenda for the first time in history. The World Bank, the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery and the WHO declared that safe surgical care is a cross-cutting, cost-effective health intervention and essential to health system strengthening; yet, surgical care is still a misunderstood, obscure field that is sometimes seen as a “luxury” rather than as essential element of primary health care. This workshop is geared to global health and development professionals who want to learn more about this “neglected step-child of global health,” recent policy developments and how surgical solutions integrate into existing public health and development priorities to save lives and reduce the cost of health care. Currently, 5 billion people lack access to safe, affordable surgical care when needed, and surgical conditions represent nearly a third of the global burden of disease.

Moderator:
Sara E. Anderson, Senior Advisor, Advocacy and Innovation, ReSurge International; Board Executive Committee, The G4 Alliance

Speakers:
Dr. Mark G. Shrime, Research Director, Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School
Dr. Tigistu Adamu Ashengo, Associate Medical Director, Technical Leadership Office, Jhpiego
Vince Blaser, Director, Frontline Health Workers Coalition, IntraHealth International


0[] 0[] Double Click, Double Standard: How Will Data and IT Become True Development Equalizers?

(Coolidge)

Data and Information Technology are tools that are used within the structure of a society.  While we praise the fact that millions of people now have access to mobile phones, technology does not necessarily change the structure of inequality and can perpetuate it in some cases.

How can we better leverage data and IT to reduce exclusion and marginalization?  The session will take a two-pronged approach to the conversation:

1) Technology as a tool for development practitioners, to improve how we do our work; and
2) Technology as an access point for target populations, putting technology in the hands of people we serve as a form of content for service delivery and training.

Moderator:
Ann Hudock, Sr. VP for International Programs, Plan International USA

Speakers:
Shanthi Kalathil, Consultant on ICT4D for World Bank, USAID, Plan
Dr. Ticora Jones, Division Chief, USAID's Global Development Lab


0[]  Cyber Security & NGOs: What Do You Need to Know?

(Hoover)

This workshop will focus on the intersection of cyber security issues and NGOs. Participants will increase their understanding of what liability organizations potentially face as a result of data breaches and insufficient technology policies. Participants will leave this discussion with a few key recommendations they can easily implement within their own organizations.

Moderator:
Tara McGraw Swaminatha, Cyber Security Legal Expert, DLA Piper

Speakers:
Jennifer Hardin, Global Risk Management Specialist, International Relief & Development
Shane Lawson, Director, Commercial Cybersecurity Practice, KEYW Corporation
Tara McGraw Swaminatha, Cyber Security Legal Expert, DLA Piper


0[]  Balancing Risks in Times of Uncertainty (InterAction Member CEOs Only)

(Madison A/B)

The presence of risk within our sector and in the contexts in which we work is not new. Often with limited data, NGO leaders must make decisions that can force a trade-off between the needs of the people we serve, and the mitigation of potential risk to our personnel, resources and reputation. Guided by InterAction’s recent analysis of risk management among 14 major operational INGOs, this session will introduce six risk categories - security (physical), fiduciary, legal/compliance, information, reputation and operational – and seek to explore how NGO leaders perceive the current risk environment for their organization. How do we interpret, differentiate, prioritize and manage risks against achievement of our mandates? What practices have we adapted that enable us to effectively manage risk within program implementation? This session will provide an opportunity for a reflection on risk within the NGO sector, and will develop insights into replicative practices through peer exchanges.

Speakers:
Patty McIlreavy, Acting Vice President, Humanitarian Policy and Practice, InterAction

Facilitators:
Sam Worthington, Chief Executive Officer, InterAction
Lindsay Coates, President, InterAction


0[] Not Mutually Exclusive: Sustainable Urban Livelihoods and Conflict

(McKinley)

This workshop will focus on the opportunities and challenges of implementing sustainable livelihoods programming within the context of urban conflict.  The workshop will be creative and experiential, using participatory methods to actively engage the audience.  

Contrary to an emphasis on traditional short-term programs within conflict-affected environments, there is evidence and arguments to be made for programming that can both meet immediate needs in an ongoing conflict and form a bridge during the transition from emergency to sustainable economic development.   The information and discussion generated in this workshop will address some of the timely and urgent issues facing conflict-affected states. The Post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals will not be achieved if the humanitarian and development communities cannot adequately adopt approaches to these challenging and dynamic contexts. It is clear that there is currently a minimal alignment between development and the scale and pace in which conflict is affecting increasing numbers of civilians.

Moderator:
Micheal Montgomery, Director, International Institute for Child Rights and Development

Speakers:
Lorna Read, Ph.D., Chief Operating Officer from War Child Canada
Dale Buscher, Senior Director for Programs, Women's Refugee Commission
Martha Brady, Senior Associate, Population Council


0[]  What's Happening With Non-Profit Standards?

(Jackson)

Participants will examine the purpose and value of InterAction’s standards and compliance mechanism. We will discuss the role of InterAction’s Private Voluntary Organization (PVO) Standards in relation to global non-profit standards and codes of conduct. We will take a deeper look into different standards and compliance procedures our members comply with outside of InterAction. This workshop will examine the role of InterAction’s PVO Standards and how it ties into the future direction of InterAction.

Speakers:
Barbara J. Wallace, Vice President, Membership & Standards, InterAction
Jonathan Duffy, CEO, Adventist Development and Relief Agency International

MONDAY, APRIL 18

1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

0[]   Embedding Innovation: What It Takes to Change Organizational Systems and Culture to Elevate Your Teams from Workers to Innovators

(Wilson A)

When McKinsey & Co. conducted a survey of senior executives, they found more than 70 percent of those executives identified ‘innovation’ as one of the top three drivers of growth within their companies, but almost the same percentage were not confident in their ability to stimulate and sustain innovation. There is no doubt that most NGOs value innovation, and many of us stake claim to developing ‘something’ innovative. Yet, as a whole, we are a community that relies more on chance discovery and creativity among a select few to innovate rather than a community that creates intentional environments that will drive innovation within and across our organizations. This workshop is designed to engage participants in the building blocks of innovation and share insights into how an international NGO, a local government and the US Agency for International Development have taken steps to intentionally build the structures, policies and culture for embedding innovation, and results they are yielding from that process.

Moderator:
Richard Parker, Vice President of Marketing and Communications, Project Concern International

Speakers:
Chris Bessenecker, VP for Strategic Initiatives and Chief Innovation Officer, Project Concern International
Alexis Bonnell, Chief of Applied Innovation and Acceleration, USAID Global Development Lab
Daniel Hoffman, Chief Innovation Officer, Montgomery County, MD


0[]   Engaging the Other Half: Educating and Empowering Women and Girls to Fight Poverty

(Wilson B)

When world leaders formally adopted the Sustainable Development Goals in September, there was much discussion around the importance of ensuring that development programs reach the most marginalized. While this is the right and just thing to do, the success of the SDGs in fact hinges on the participation and empowerment of the women and girls around the world, who are so often left out of school and without formal employment opportunities. The workshop will focus on policies and programs underway to 1) improve girls' education, 2) address adolescent girls' health, and 3) support female empowerment.  Speakers will take the discussion a step further and explore what changes to policy and practice are necessary in order to unleash the full potential of women and girls around the world and to move the needle on international development by 2030.

Moderator:
Yolande Miller-Grandvaux, Lead for Let Girls Learn and Senior Education Advisor, USAID Office of Education

Speakers:
Cory Heyman, Chief Program Officer, Room to Read
Callie Simon, Senior Technical Advisor for Applied Learning in SRHR, Pathfinder
Charles Benjamin, President, Near East Foundation


0[]  Closing Civil Society Space: Are NGO’s Victims or Enablers?

(Wilson C)

Since January 2012, more than 100 laws have been proposed or enacted by governments all over the world aimed at restricting the registration, operation and funding of non-governmental organizations (NGOs). While human rights organizations and activists in the countries of such restrictive environments have frequently been the prime targets, the shrinking of civil society space hurts the whole sector (both national and international). Successful efforts to block restrictive legislation have typically been cross-sectoral coalitions that have come together to mount strong opposition on the ground.  The international non- profit sector has been lagging behind its response. Responses to date have been piecemeal and limited, but the complexity and scope of the problem requires a collective approach aimed at both operational and policy making levels. It’s time for us to do our part by strategizing together on messaging and advocacy targets that play to different strengths of our diverse membership.

Moderator:
Jenna Capeci, Director Civil & Political Affairs, American Jewish World Service

Speakers:
Stephen Moody, Global Affairs Section Chief, Office of Multilateral and Global Affairs, U.S. Department of State
Andrea Hall, Communication/Outreach Associate, Charity & Security Network
Regan Ralph, President & CEO, Fund for Global Human Rights
Keith Slack, Global Program Manager of Oxfam America's Extractive Industries


0[]  Supporting the 90%: Approaches to Staff Care for National Staff

(Harding)

The proportion of national staff in international relief and development agencies is often 90 percent or more and is one of the more visible shifts in aid work over the past two decades. Over the past ten years, another important shift in aid work has been occurring:  the increasing attention to the psychological health of aid workers.  Relief and development organizations have increased the services they offer to their staff to help them prepare for and cope with the stressors of the work.  However, international staff are typically provided significantly more support than national staff members. This inequity is difficult to justify given how reliant aid organizations are on national staff.  This session will explore a variety of approaches and good practices to national staff support and include concrete and practical ideas that participants can apply in their own organizations.

Moderator:
Lynne Cripe, Director of Resilience Services, The KonTerra Group

Speaker:
David Loquercio, Head of Policy, Advocacy and Learning, CHS Alliance
Saleh Dhumad, Psychiatrist, KonTerra Group


0[]  Creating Government Policy Changes through the Power of Partnership

(Coolidge)

From global issues such as global warming and Syrian refugee crisis, to domestic topics such as equal pay and education rights, establishment or changes of government policies often cause fundamental impact on the people involved.  In this workshop, explore the key factors and process of successful partnership building among NGO, corporations, and government agencies to powerfully create government policy changes.

Moderator:
Yi-Miao Huang, Executive Director, STUF United Fund

Speakers:
Rachel Lyons, Senior Government Affairs Manager, National Partnership for Women & Families
Prudence Wang, Member, International Association for Volunteer Effort
Peter Hou, Founder, CTEP Cambodia-Taiwan Education Program


0[] 0[] Beyond Voice - Citizen Engagement in World Bank Operations

(Hoover)

Since its 2013 pledge to increase beneficiary feedback to 100% of its operations, the World Bank has stepped up Citizen Engagement (CE) to achieve its mission and promote inclusion, building on a long history of multi-stakeholder engagement.

While the beneficiary feedback pledge continues to attract attention, other fronts – predating the Citizen Engagement Framework, show promising results in engaging citizens for improved development results. Most notably, the Global Partnership for Social Accountability (GPSA), created in 2012, currently supports the implementation of over thirty CSO-led initiatives to enhance citizen voice, across multiple sectors such as Health, Education & Water, within nearly 50 developing countries.

This session will explore the space for CE in Bank operations with particular focus on the opportunity the GPSA presents to expand beyond citizen feedback within Bank operations, but rather on the program’s ability to leverage Bank operations to create greater space for citizen voice within governments themselves.

Speakers:
Edith Jibunoh, Civil Society Adviser, External and Corporate Relations, World Bank Group
Andres Falconer, Global Partnership for Social Accountability, World Bank Group


0[]  Evolving Our Response in Today’s Changing Landscape (InterAction CEOs only)

(Madison A/B)

With a universal framework that will shape human wellbeing through 2030 what is the role of the U.S. NGO? How we adapt ourselves to provide assistance in different settings, including in fragile and often violent environments, will shape NGOs for decades to come. What do these frameworks mean for your work as you partner with local civil society, multilateral, bilateral and UN agencies, foundations, and private donors?  How does your relationship with partners evolve as resources shift to local actors and what are some key tradeoffs? Our opening plenary session discussed the role of different actors in all facets of development including good governance, human rights, humanitarian assistance, climate change and rising inequalities. This session will go one step further, exploring the role of INGOs as they focus their limited resources to have the greatest impact. 

Moderators:
Sam Worthington, Chief Executive Officer, InterAction

Speakers:
Ben Jackson, Chief Executive, Bond
Bill Abrams, President, Trickle Up
Burkhard Gnaerig, Executive Director, International Civil Society Center
Dr. Ahmad Faizal Perdaus, President, Mercy Malaysia
Dr. Carolyn Woo, President & CEO, Catholic Relief Services


0[]  Reaching the Global Nutrition Targets – What Will it Cost and How Do We Get There?

(McKinley)

Last year, world leaders agreed to a historic goal: to end malnutrition in all its forms by 2030 – a target made explicit in SDG 2 but vital to achieving all global goals. Though ambitious, this target is achievable if nutrition funding is a priority. Currently, proven nutrition interventions are underfunded and greater investment is urgently needed from all sources.

The World Bank, Results for Development Institute (R4D) and 1,000 Days, in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and CIFF, have developed costing and financing estimates for the global targets for stunting, wasting, anemia, and breastfeeding. These estimates form the evidence base for the nutrition community to formulate an even stronger case for increased investments at this summer’s Nutrition for Growth summit in Brazil, and beyond.

This presentation features the newly released estimates to reach the global targets and leaders from the organizations that partnered for this research.

Moderator: 
Augustin Flory, Nutrition Executive Director, Children's International Fund Foundation

Speakers:
Shan Soe-Lin, Program Director, Results for Development Institute (R4D)
Ellen Piwoz, Senior Program Officer, Nutrition, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Forum 2016 Sponsors

UPSPlan InternationalZakat FoundationPlanet AidSIT Graduate InstituteNCBA CLUSATzu ChiMercy CorpsGlobal CommunitiesIslamic ReliefPublic Interest RegistrySave the ChildrenSolidarity CenterSolidarity Center