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A miracle in Mogadishu

In a hunger crisis like the one Somalis have been experiencing throughout 2017, our teams witness some really harrowing sights and hear some desperately sad stories. But what drives them on, day after day, is the belief that they can help change the course of history and make things better. And they believe that because they’ve seen it happen — with kids like Yasmiin*.

Somalia's "long rains" do nothing to shorten drought

LIVING ON A “KNIFE-EDGE”

Somalia has four seasons: two rainy (Gu and Deyr) and two dry (Jilaal and Hagaa). This year’s Jilaal, which lasts from December to March, was hotter and drier than normal, putting increasing pressure on dwindling water resources. A post-Jilaal evaluation showed elevated risk of extreme hunger.

Best of 2016: Our Five Most Popular Blogs

What a year! To date, 2016 has seen many major accomplishments, such as the passing of the Global Food Security Act, and moments that challenged us, such as Hurricane Matthew and the ongoing crisis in Syria.

Climate Change Action and the Critical Role of NGOs

Humanitarian crises over the last decade illustrate the concept of inequitable impacts of climate change. The 2011 Horn of Africa famine — caused by a two yearlong drought, a result of the La Niña weather pattern, killed 260,000 people. Typhoon Winston, the worst storm to ever hit Fiji, flattened villages just recently. And a three yearlong drought in Syria exacerbated unstable political conditions that resulted in Europe’s current migrant crisis.

Instability and assault on the poor require us to respond

In his clarion call to action on climate change, Pope Francis echoes the statements and sentiments of many religious leaders and church bodies.

The Cassandra of Our Time: Climate Change and Women

“Each one of us is impacting the environment, but not equally. Each one of us will be affected, but not equally.” – Weathering Change

Climate change not only affects temperatures but weather conditions, glaciers, water levels, crop yields, and species such as polar bears. Now, climate change has begun to affect women’s lives. The issue of climate change is now closer to home than ever before.

Mozambique’s Coconut Graveyards

Orlando Albinho spent much of his 40 years collecting coconuts from the tops of leafy palm trees and selling them in the local market or to nearby factories that made soap and oil from the dried white flesh.

Three years ago, everything changed.

Re-thinking Poverty in Light of Climate Change

334 species of plants. 693 different kinds of animals, including 49 species of mammals, 59 reptiles and 315 water birds. 1,600 square miles of land and 725 square miles of water. Three wildlife sanctuaries. The Sundarbans, the world’s largest, contiguous mangrove forest located along the coast of India and Bangladesh in the Bay of Bengal, is home to all of this. Just outside, 1.7 million people live along the forest's outskirts, with many depending on its resources.

Not Your Typical Hot Spot - But One the Humanitarian Community Must Monitor

For international security analysts, humanitarian operations planners, and humanitarian logisticians, the ability to identify emerging global hot spots is crucial. Over the coming months, areas such as Syria, the Crimea, Venezuela, Sudan, and the Central African Republic will no doubt make a list of potential shatter belts, complex emergencies, and geopolitical flashpoints worth monitoring.

Why the G8 'Commitments' Lacked Measurable Actions

Last month G8 leaders met at the exclusive Lough Erne golf resort in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. Yet, what were the practical implications for those living in extreme poverty around the world or – for that matter – the 99 percent of people living in the G8 countries? Were concrete actions taken?

Before the summit, I wrote a piece about measurable actions the G8 should take that would bring meaningful change to people around the world. So, how did they do?

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