Related Blogs

Imagining “Bold Endgames” in Global Health

On Monday, InterAction published a new briefing book, Global Health: Investing in Our Future, on the most critical health issues our members tackle around the world. It highlights how much good U.S. health programs have done around the world, including:

Using Technology for STH Control

I consider myself extremely fortunate and even spoiled in this 21st century with smart phones and so much mobile technology available. If I ever feel there is a need to make my life more convenient with technology, chances are I can go to the app store to download some utility that will help. And, even if it’s not 100% satisfactory, by virtue of having asked the question or conducted the search for this app, some techie out there is likely monitoring the query and I can probably be assured that in weeks, if not days, something better will be created.

A Policy Primer On Foreign Aid, And Not Just For Congress

U.S. foreign assistance is not only a critical piece of U.S. foreign policy – it is important for millions of the world’s most poor and vulnerable striving to improve their lives. That’s why it’s crucial that we understand what works and what should be prioritized. These decisions must come from individuals who are engaged with the issues, have decades of experience, and possess personal knowledge of the challenges.

Promoting Public-Private Partnerships to Improve Women’s Health

In Kenya’s urban slums, an ambitious effort is under way to meet the reproductive health care needs of women who struggle to receive the most basic medical care. The project strives to reach women where they live, employing innovative approaches like mobile health clinics, mothers’ support groups and teams of community health workers going door to door. What also distinguishes this project in today’s environment of foreign aid debates and tight budgets is the dynamic group of public and private partners committed to its success.

Clean Water: Crucial Ingredient for Effective Development

Recent efforts by the United States to support global health, food security and environmental stewardship are to be commended. But looking ahead at the next four years, we can do more to support a cause that undergirds international development and ensure the effectiveness of U.S. assistance abroad.

Dear Mr. President: Pathfinder's Open Letter To President Obama In Support Of Reproductive Health

Dear Mr. President,

2012 seemed to be the year of the “war on women.” Policies and programs promoting women’s health and rights both domestically and abroad routinely came under attack by U.S. policymakers.

Foreign Aid Cuts Affect Us All

The final segment of the presidential debates is over. Unfortunately, not much was said about the importance and impact of U.S. aid to developing countries. We all know that the global economic climate is tough and it’s unreasonable to expect any increases in foreign aid. But what we can expect and hope will come to pass no matter who is in elected president next month, is that foreign assistance for global health and humanitarian aid will not be cut disproportionately.

Such drastic cuts would be ruinous. In fact, they would cost lives. 

A Celebration Of The Last 20 Years – And A Wish For NTDs In The Next 20

Over the last 20 years, more than 250 million people have been reached with life-saving neglected tropical disease (NTD) interventions. To mark this significant achievement, USAID recently convened a group of NTD champions to celebrate the delivery of a half a billion treatments against NTDs worldwide.

Racing Toward Breast Cancer Awareness In Sarajevo

Breast Cancer Awareness Month has only just begun, but JDC’s Women’s Health Empowerment Program is already in high gear. As I make my way back from the 5th Annual Race for the Cure that took place in Sarajevo last weekend, my heart swells with pride, thinking of how far we’ve come since the program’s inception.

Health Workers Can Help Stamp Out Poverty

They say wealthier is healthier, and there’s evidence to back that up.

While money alone can’t buy good health, the poor are significantly more likely to experience poor health. But like many of poverty’s symptoms, poor health can also cause poverty.

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