Related Blogs

Imagining “Bold Endgames” in Global Health

On Monday, InterAction published a new briefing book, Global Health: Investing in Our Future, on the most critical health issues our members tackle around the world. It highlights how much good U.S. health programs have done around the world, including:

A Policy Primer On Foreign Aid, And Not Just For Congress

U.S. foreign assistance is not only a critical piece of U.S. foreign policy – it is important for millions of the world’s most poor and vulnerable striving to improve their lives. That’s why it’s crucial that we understand what works and what should be prioritized. These decisions must come from individuals who are engaged with the issues, have decades of experience, and possess personal knowledge of the challenges.

Clean Water: Crucial Ingredient for Effective Development

Recent efforts by the United States to support global health, food security and environmental stewardship are to be commended. But looking ahead at the next four years, we can do more to support a cause that undergirds international development and ensure the effectiveness of U.S. assistance abroad.

Striving To Reduce Poverty In Chad, One Dam At A Time

Lake Chad, once the sixth-largest lake in the world, has shrunk by more than 90 percent over the last 40 years. 20 million people faced dislocation and starvation as farmlands and livelihoods disappeared. For them, the combined impact of climate change and water mismanagement created a crisis that was unimaginable, and they joined the millions of others who face chronic poverty and food shortages in West Africa’s Sahel Region.

To Eradicate Poverty, Water And Sanitation Are Vital

This week the global community marks its 20th year in observing the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Eradicating extreme poverty and hunger is the first of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDG) that world leaders committed to more than a decade ago. The goal includes a target to halve, by the year 2015, the proportion of people living in extreme poverty – people whose income is less than one dollar a day. Yet, all other MDG targets contribute to this one – and vice versa.

Is Gaza Livable?

The United Nations has released a report predicting that Gaza will be "unlivable" by 2020, with nearly 2.1 million Gazans expected to be displaced by deteriorating water, power, health, education and sanitation services.  As I sit here without electricity to cook dinner for my family, I have news for the UN: Gaza is already unlivable. I feel lucky when the power is out for only six hours now, compared to 18 hours a few months back, during an unbearably hot summer when fuel supplies were not getting into Gaza.  

New Collaborations to Address Neglected Tropical Diseases

It is hard to believe where the time goes. We are already into February, off to a great start on the heels of a year where major global health partners gained momentum in taking on intestinal worms, one of the most serious Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) affecting children, through school-based deworming programs. It had been sort of a David vs. Goliath situation, Goliath being the seemingly invincible burden of NTDs, David, a symbol of the community trying to tackle the indefatigable beast. Until now.

Signs of Hope in Haiti

Haiti’s earthquake was one of the world’s worst-ever urban crises. In contrast to a rural emergency, such a large-scale natural disaster in a densely-populated city presents immense logistical and recovery challenges.

Reflections On A Year Fighting Worms

2011 has been a banner year for those of us in the global health community who are working to tackle Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs), especially for those of us who focus on the dreaded intestinal worms that affect more than one billion people around the world. And of those one billion, it is children who bear the brunt of the burden. Worms affect children because they are just being children – playing in the soil, exploring their surroundings, being carefree and innocent – totally unaware of the danger lurking in the very soil that is our lifeline.

Pages