Food Aid Reform: Working with the Administration

Food Aid Reform
Working with the Administration

In its fiscal year 2014 budget request, the Obama administration outlined a food aid reform proposal that would have allowed life-saving assistance to reach an additional four million people while making it more flexible and efficient. Congress largely rejected the proposal, and InterAction has worked closely with the administration to advance responsible food aid reform over the past several years.

The president’s fiscal year 2015 and 2016 food aid reform proposals have built on previous reform efforts, including requesting new authority to use up to 25 percent of the total Food for Peace Title II appropriation in emergencies for interventions such as local or regional procurement of food, food vouchers, or cash transfers. As the President’s budget request stated, this flexibility would ensure that emergency food assistance would be timelier and more cost-effective, thereby improving program efficiencies and performance, and would allow USAID to reach more than 2 million additional beneficiaries each year with the same level of resources. 

InterAction strongly supports bill language that would provide new authority to use up to 45 percent of the Food for Peace Title II appropriation in emergencies for interventions such as local or regional procurement of food, food vouchers, or cash transfers. InterAction estimates that increased funds and the 45 percent flexibility provision could allow USAID to reach up to 4.5 million more beneficiaries each year with the same level of resources. InterAction will continue to engage the administration to ensure that U.S. NGO priorities are included in any future food aid reform proposals.