Laia Griñó

Laia Griñó is Director of Transparency, Accountability and Results at InterAction, the largest alliance of international NGOs and partners in the U.S. Laia leads InterAction’s efforts to increase transparency, accountability and effectiveness in the NGO sector, and to increase the transparency of U.S. foreign assistance. This involves supporting the development of InterAction’s NGO Aid Map, advocating for improvements in the quality and accessibility of aid data published by the U.S. government, and managing InterAction’s Evaluation and Program Effectiveness Working Group (EPEWG). This working group seeks to improve InterAction members’ capacity to measure their effectiveness, and to inform donor M&E policies and practices.

Laia is currently leading a two-year, multi-partner project to increase the transparency of funding for food security and agriculture. The goal of this work is to ensure that those providing funding in this sector have the data they need to make good investment decisions, and that those working to improve the effectiveness of those resources have the data they need to hold organizations accountable.

With InterAction since 2007, she has expertise on a diverse set of issues including aid effectiveness, local ownership, foreign aid reform, private development assistance, open (and responsible) data, and monitoring and evaluation. Laia holds a BA in International Relations from the University of Southern California and a Master of Science in Foreign Service (MSFS) with a concentration in international development from Georgetown University.

Congress Sends a Clear Message about the Value of Transparency

On Tuesday, July 5, Congress passed the Foreign Aid Transparency and Accountability Act (H.R.3766). This bipartisan bill makes U.S. foreign assistance more effective and accountable, and has had strong support in both the House and the Senate under the leadership of Sens. Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Ben Cardin (D-MD), and Reps. Ted Poe (R-TX) and Gerry Connolly (D-VA).

InterAction’s NGO Aid Map Publishes 11,500+ Projects to IATI – and Counting

Starting today, NGO Aid Map will begin publishing its data to the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI). This means the addition of data from more than 100 InterAction member organizations with thousands of projects, spanning almost all countries and sectors. NGO Aid Map data will be published daily so there is little to no delay between the time we get data from our members and the time it becomes available via the IATI Registry.

The U.S. Commits to the Right Things in Foreign Aid Transparency: Increasing Quality and Use

Last week, the U.S. government released its third National Action Plan for the Open Government Partnership (OGP). Included in the plan is a strong commitment to improving foreign aid transparency. The commitment focuses on what matters most in aid transparency at this point: improving the quality of the data published, and increasing the use of that data.

“One-Click” Publishing to IATI

InterAction has just published information on its grant-funded activities to the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI) for the third time. Since first publishing in March 2015, we’ve considerably improved our publication process. It’s only a slight exaggeration to say that we can now publish to IATI with just one click of a button. In case it might be of use to others, here’s how we did it.

USAID Moving On Up on Aid Transparency

In 2014 USAID ranked at the bottom of the “Fair” category of Publish What You Fund’s Aid Transparency Index, narrowly missing joining a few fellow U.S. government agencies that were rated as “Poor.” Less than a year later USAID has jumped into the “Good” category. That improvement, noted in PWYF’s 2015 U.S. Aid Transparency Review, clearly demonstrates that where there’s a will, there’s a way.

Lessons from the Road to Transparency: Four Tips for Publishing to IATI

In honor of Sunshine Week – a weeklong celebration of open government – we’d like to share four lessons InterAction has learned in our own journey towards openness.

A Missing Piece in Local Ownership: Evaluation

Ten years ago, ownership was established as a key principle of aid effectiveness. Although understanding of ownership has evolved since then – most significantly, as something that involves not just governments but all parts of society – today the focus is not on whether ownership is important but on how we can move ownership from principle to practice. To date, these conversations have primarily concerned how to make ownership a reality in program design and implementation. InterAction supports these efforts, but believes they need to go one step further.

How Good is the Data on NGO Aid Map?

Balancing the tension between providing enough, timely or high quality data is tricky – it’s often hard to do all of those things at once. Still, if data is not good enough it can’t be used, rendering transparency meaningless.

Before getting into what NGO Aid Map is doing to improve data quality, it’s worth revisiting what we mean by that. When we wrote about this topic last year, our definition of data quality had three dimensions:

InterAction Moves Forward on Transparency

On Wednesday, Publish What You Fund (PWYF) will launch its 2014 Aid Transparency Index, which ranks donors according to the amount – and quality – of the aid information they publish. As a partner, we know that every year the Index prompts a mad rush around the deadline for data collection, as donors seek to improve their scores.

U.S. Foreign Assistance Dashboard Can’t Be Everything to Everyone

The Foreign Assistance Dashboard is about to go through a redesign process. Recognizing that it has a diverse audience with many different interests, the Dashboard team plans to consult a wide range of stakeholders, including in-country partners. For this, they deserve credit. The trick, however, will be not to fall prey to the illusion that it is possible to design one site that will serve everyone’s needs.

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Laia Griñó's picture
Title: 
Director, Transparency, Accountability and Results
Phone: 
202-552-6567
Department: 
Global Development Practice
Member Organization: