Lindsay Coates

Lindsay Coates is the president of InterAction, overseeing all management issues and institutional outreach to InterAction members and partners. A life-long advocate for human dignity, Lindsay currently serves on the steering committee of the World Bank Global Partnership for Social Accountability, the executive committee for Modernizing Foreign Assistance Network (MFAN), and the boards of Episcopal Relief and Development (ERD) and United State Global Leadership Coalition (USGLC).  She also served on the Obama administration’s task force on Global Poverty, was a Trustee for her alma mater the University of the South at Sewanee, and a board member for the Mississippi Volunteer Lawyers Project and the Global Heath Council.

Before joining InterAction in 2008, she was the COO of Population Action International, a leading international NGO advocating for access to family planning services. Prior to her work in the nonprofit sector, Lindsay practiced civil rights law in various capacities. She began her career in Mississippi, and then served as chief of staff for the U.S. Department of Education, and an equal employment opportunity attorney at the National Gallery of Art.

From 2008-2009, Lindsay was a nonresident fellow of Seminar XXI, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for International Studies. She holds a JD from the University of Mississippi, a B.A. magna cum laude from Sewanee, and has studied at the London School of Economics.

United We Stand: A Preview of InterAction Forum 2017

Amid rapid changes and increased uncertainty here in the U.S. and around the world, the needs of and demands upon our community are also shifting.

Recent Executive Order Runs Counter to America's Values and Interests

Vivid stories and images of suffering and struggle from around the globe— Syria, North East Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Yemen along with families caught in the global migration crisis—are fueling compassion and a will to act among Americans. In response to the administration’s proposed budget cuts to USAID and the Department of State, we see renewed bipartisan support for development as a key aspect of U.S. foreign policy.

Standing United in a Time of Uncertainty

At this moment, when institutions and norms of governance, economics, and human relationship are being questioned, finding common ground for discussion, much less progress, feels elusive. During this time of uncertainty it is essential for civil society all over the world to remember and renew our core values and mission. InterAction and our members are counted among the internationalists.

Congress Takes Bipartisan Stand Against Global Hunger

Seeing that your family has a steady and stable supply of healthy and nutritious food is a fundamental commitment—and mission—of all mothers and fathers around the globe. It's a value, a need and an imperative that crosses cultural, geographic, and gender lines. And today it's a principle that crosses partisan lines in Congress, with the final passage of the Global Food Security Act (H.R. 1567/S. 1252).

Reflecting on 2015: What Images Inspire You?

Images can accomplish in a glance what we try to persuade others of every day. We, who fight to end global poverty and promote human dignity, can quickly get into the minutia of microfinancing in Iraq or improving food security in Togo – and that is important.  But we don’t do this work only because it’s technically challenging or innovative; we do it because of how lives can change. 

The Post-2015 Agenda: A Global Call to Increase Civil Society Space

This month, leaders from 193 countries will gather in New York City to formally adopt the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As we move from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) to the SDGs, it’s critical to acknowledge how they differ. The MDGs rest on an older model of development – richer nations provide development assistance to poorer countries.

Ebola: The Fight to Reach Zero and the Road to Recovery

This spring we mark the one year anniversary of the onset of the largest Ebola outbreak in history. The crisis has resulted in over 25,551 cases and over 10,588 deaths. It has highlighted the immediate challenges community members and response workers face operating in fragile healthcare systems and its broader effects on local economies, food security, and cultural norms.

Women as Leaders in Peaceful Transition

Women are often disproportionately affected by armed conflict, yet are also often excluded from peace processes and seen as helpless and vulnerable victims in need of protection. This month we mark International Women's Day 2015 by celebrating women's progress toward greater political, social, and economic freedoms.

Invest to Save Lives and Build Sustainable Communities

The collective contributions of the U.S. government and civil society have led to significant progress in addressing global poverty. But the world is complex - new challenges emerge and considerable work remains.

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Lindsay Coates's picture
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President
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Executive Office
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