Sam Worthington

Sam Worthington is Chief Executive Officer of InterAction, the largest U.S. alliance of nongovernmental international organizations, with more than 220 members and partners. Mr. Worthington leads the U.S. NGO sector’s engagement with the UN, governments, and civil society groups around the world. He testifies before the U.S. Congress, routinely consults with the administration, speaks to boards and at universities, and is a regular contributor on numerous national and international media outlets. Mr. Worthington is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations; serves on the Advisory Committee for Voluntary Foreign Assistance (ACVFA) at USAID and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) at the UN; and sits on the boards of the Center for Disaster Philanthropy, Van Leer Group Foundation, FORUS, and The Alliance to End Hunger. Previously he served as chief executive officer of Plan International USA (1994 to 2006) and as a policy fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center.

InterAction's Samuel A. Worthington: Stand With the People of Syria

It was just a few years ago that ordinary Syrian citizens were living their lives. Shops were open for business, bakeries were filled with warm Markook flatbread, schools were packed with children, and hospitals were sanctuaries for the sick.

A 30th Anniversary Wish List of Headlines for 2014

This is a critical time for those of us working toward a more equitable, peaceful and sustainable world. 2014 marks the run-up to reaching the anti-poverty Millennium Development Goals, setting a new global development and sustainability agenda for post-2015 and achieving an accord to counter climate change. As we push for continued positive and lasting global change for the world’s poor, U.S. NGOs have an increasingly important role to play – one that is vastly different than 30 years ago when InterAction was established. 

Looking Back on 2013

For development and humanitarian actors, 2013 was a year of crisis, change and ambitious vision in which InterAction members continued to carry out their missions around the world while adapting to a rapidly changing funding and policy ecosystem.

A Letter from InterAction's CEO on Typhoon Haiyan

Super Typhoon Haiyan that struck the Philippines last week has triggered a massive and coordinated global response. As our community mobilizes and responds, I want to take a moment to share what we know so far, and to ask for your help.

Aiming High on the Post-2015 Agenda

Some degree of poverty will always exist in the world. But the end of extreme poverty—bringing the number of people living on less than $1.25 per day to virtually zero—is for the first time in history an attainable goal. To achieve it, we must redouble our efforts before the Millennium Development Goals expire, and we must enshrine this bold vision in the goals that replace them.

Celebrating World Poverty Day with a Bold Commitment

We live in a world where more than 1 billion people struggle to find enough to eat every day. More than 1 billion live in homes with inadequate roofs and no latrines. Basic services like schools and health centers are out of reach. For many individuals life remains a struggle to find the most basic human dignity.

This is our world today. But it does not have to be our world tomorrow.

Finding Our Common Voice and Our Collective Power

On June 20, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of InterAction and our coplaintiffs in AOSI vs. USAID, a case challenging a 2003 law that required all groups receiving U.S. government funds for international HIV and AIDS work to have a policy explicitly opposing prostitution. The issue at hand was not prostitution, or its victims, but whether our government has the right to dictate what U.S. NGOs must say as they implement programs with private resources.

Investing in Security in a Difficult Budget Environment

Many of you know the feeling of walking or driving in an insecure environment outside the UN wire or the rush to get back to a compound before curfew. Security has always been a reality for NGOs but increasingly it is central to their work. In today’s economic climate U.S. NGOs are being pressed to deliver more aid with fewer resources. Overhead costs and funds for developing or maintaining agency-wide capacity, including security staff and systems, are often first to suffer cuts.

Using Maps for More Than Just Shipping

Walking around Port-au-Prince, Haiti in the months after the 2010 earthquake, I was confronted with a major challenge. How could InterAction, as the largest coalition of more than 180 U.S. humanitarian and international development non-profits, actually help coordinate the massive engagement of our member NGOs?

InterAction's Food Security Pledge: $1 Billion of Potential Leverage

Last fall InterAction pledged that its member NGOs would spend more than $1 billion (InterAction has since increased the pledge to $1.5 billion) in private resources on food security, agriculture and nutrition work over the next three years.  It may come as a surprise that U.S.-based NGOs have this amount of private resources to commit to ensuring more families worldwide have the food they need. Thanks to support from the individuals, foundations and corporations who believe in their cause and approach, they do. 

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Sam Worthington's picture
Title: 
CEO
Department: 
Executive Office